Derrick J’s Victimless Crime Spree is BACK!

This Monday 11/17, Free State Project participants will be releasing their 2nd movie produced in New Hampshire called “101 Reasons Liberty Lives in New Hampshire“. The new movie is being edited by FSP early mover Beau Davis, who was also the editor of the 1st FSP-participant-produced movie, the feature-length documentary, “Derrick J’s Victimless Crime Spree“.

To celebrate the imminent release of 101 Reasons, we’re releasing the Director’s Cut of DJVCS for the first time ever on YouTube! Of course the YouTube version doesn’t have the TWO commentary tracks or hours of bonus activist footage that you can only find on the DVD – so grab your copy or buy it as a gift for the holidays for under $10 at Amazon!

Here’s the Director’s Cut of the movie on YouTube:

And as an added bonus, here’s the QnA session with the producers that happened after the real-life premiere at Keene Cinemas in 2012: (more…)

Liberty in North Korea Visits Keene – This Saturday 11/8, 1pm @ KSC

Liberty in North KoreaTomorrow (Saturday 11/8) at 1pm at the Putnam Science Center of Keene State College, you’ll be able to hear from representatives of Liberty in North Korea presenting about the jangmadang, the illegal marketplace that is now tolerated to some extent by the North Korean regime. The LINK folks are currently on a nationwide tour and have also visited Keene High School this week with a presentation.

Come on out at 1pm Saturday – here’s a facebook event you can join and share.

NH Supreme Court Decides “Jury Nullification” Law Not A Jury Nullification Law

Rich Paul 420 2014

Rich Paul

I always thought the language in RSA 519:23-a (commonly referred to as the jury nullification statute) was weak. In fact, the state’s attorney argued in front of the NH supreme court that before it passed into law, the legislature stripped all mention of jury nullification from the original bill. From the state’s perspective, their attorney was correct, and the supreme court unanimously affirmed that the statute is not a jury nullification statute.  Here’s their seven-page decision.

The statute in question is a shadow of what it should have been. Perhaps the legislature can try again and get it right this time. Until then, whether or not a defendant will be allowed to tell a jury about nullification (which has happened multiple times thus far in NH) remains up-to-the-judge in the case, it seems.  Stay tuned to Free Keene for or NHJury.com for the latest news about jury rights in New Hampshire.

Reason has an excellent take on the news here, and FIJA’s opinion is here.

Burke Shows Mercy in Victimless ID “Crime” Sentencing (Full Video)

burke

Edward Burke

A name change costs just over $100 through the probate court in New Hampshire.  It involves a simple form and a super fast hearing in front of a judge.  (So fast it was over just after I got my camera rolling!  Literally, less than 30 seconds.)  However, when you are a known activist with a message of ending the idea of the violent monopoly state, a simple name change could get far more expensive.  This one is going to cost 100 hours of community service, plus having a year of jail hanging over my head for two years,  the arrest, bail conditions, and time blown in court.

While judge Edward Burke of Keene district court should have dismissed the ridiculous case against me for victimless ID “crimes” outright, he ultimately issued a sentence today that from his perspective, made sense to lay out.  The state police prosecutor asked for a $500 fine, 60 days in jail, and 10 months suspended.  Since I was facing two “class A misdemeanors”, Burke could have gone draconian and hit me with two years in prison.  Ultimately, after statements from me and my business partner Mark Edge, Burke sentenced me to 100 hours of community service (50 per charge) and hung twelve months in jail over my head for two years.

His sentence was also smart from Burke’s perspective because it still appeases the state’s power over others while at the same time disincentivizes me from appealing the case to a de novo (“from the beginning”) jury trial.  Why not appeal?  Well, it was my plan to appeal if I was hit with significant jail time (more than a couple weeks). Consider my experience in 2011, where despite beating one of my two charges at a jury, the robed man there sentenced me to a 50% greater sentence than Burke had for both of the charges at the initial bench trial! So, jury de novos have their own risks, at least until NH statute can be changed to prevent de novo trial judges from sentencing harsher than bench trial judges.

Burke has in recent years made some pro-freedom rulings when he threw out the outrageous “NO TRESPASS FOREVER” order banning from the entire Cheshire superior court property several liberty activists (including myself) as written by the Sheriff.  Burke later tossed out (more…)