Lemonade “Terrorism”

On August 20th, 2011 at 12:31pm on the Capitol lawn in Washington DC, Kathryn Dill, William Duffield, and I were arrested for selling 10cent cups of lemonade.  The events leading up to our arrest, along with our capture and kidnapping were beautifully documented by several activists who came armed with cameras (see high quality video below); therefore, I feel no need to cover those details.  However, once we were taken away, there were no more cameras to share our experience.

 

First, we were placed in a cage in the back of a van and taken to the police station.  Upon arriving, police took Will inside, leaving Kathryn and I in the sweltering cage.  The men in blue guarding our cage continually taunted us; making jokes and expressing their enjoyment of “locking us away for the weekend”, and how our arrests were “marvelous”.  When it was my turn to enter booking, I was taken to a room where I was photographed, forced to remove my jewelry and shoes, then cuffed to a bar while an officer rubbed every part of my body, including my breasts and vagina.  I was then led down the hall to a small room where I would spend the next 4 hours chained to the wall.

Officer Weatherbee was assigned to my room.  He began a standard line of questioning, failing to read me my rights in advance.  I was continually told I would be caged if I failed to give them every detail they requested, which included the names, phone numbers, addresses, ages, etc… of my friends and family.  I constantly asked “Who was the victim of my supposed crime?”, to which they continually answered, “society”.  When I pointed out that the majority of the crowd had been supportive of our cause, and that ‘society’ was not a person whom I could confront in a court (therefore eliminating my right to face my accuser); I was laughed at and taunted.  I was also told that my friends would be arrested should they attempt to protest our capture at the police station.  One officer smirked, “I can do this [booking prisoners] all day.  Arrest as many as you want.”

After a couple of hours, a man in jeans and a blue shirt came into my room with a notepad and paper.  While I don’t remember the name of his job title (Capitol Criminal Investigator or something like that), he basically explained that he investigated organizations that the government believed to be potential terrorist, and the “Lemonade Liberation” had become their newest big threat.  Although friendly and very light hearted, he seemed aggravated with the lack of information I was giving him.  He wanted to know who the leaders of the organization were [none]; where we held our meetings [we never had any]; where we are based out of [everywhere]; what other plans we had [none]; and a whole line of ridiculous questions that were geared towards finding dangerous, violent, angry people.  Thats not us.  After several hours of friendly, yet inappropriate questioning, I finally asked, “Where is your line in the sand?  At what point do you say, ‘No. That goes too far, and I’m not willing to do that to peaceful people’?  Because if you don’t know where that line is, you’re gonna blindly cross it one day, and regret it for the rest of your life.”  It was at that point he fell silent, then left without saying another word.

Eventually I was able to call my mom from one of the officer’s cell phones (because their landlines were all busy), and she was able to contact Nathan Cox, who was able to bring my ID and the names, addresses, and phone numbers the police were demanding they get before releasing me.  I was taken to a room where all my tattoos were photographed, and multiple versions of my fingerprints were scanned; after which, I was promptly returned to my room and re-chained to the wall.  Finally I was taken down a hallway, forced to put an ink thumb print on a stack of paper work, handed my copy, then given back my property, and told I was free to go.

It wasn’t until after we were out that we heard about all the support that had poured in for us immediately after our arrest.  We discovered there had been a massive call flood to the police station, which we realized had been the direct reason our captors became more and more friendly as our detention progressed.  I also discovered that the police had attempted to discourage Kathryn and Will with lies like, “Those people with the cameras were just using you for their own agenda” or “they didn’t give you a Lemonade Liberation tshirt (some shirts a few of us had made for the event), because they are not your friends.”  Luckily these tactics failed; however, I found it encouraging that they didn’t even attempt this with me.  I knew better, and the cops were aware of that.

Our charges were:

  • Vending without a permit
  • Unlawful conduct
  • Failure to obey

We have all been scheduled to appear in court on October 4th, and we are hoping that people will come out and show their support; be it for us, our cause, or the children who wish to create their own lemonade stand without being harassed or threatened by men with guns.  Details about this event can be found here.

While being arrested is not something I enjoy, I am honored I had the opportunity to participate in such a beautiful demonstration of innocence and peace; and shine light on how it is under attack by the very people sworn to protect it.  But the real heros of the day were those who ignored the threats of arrest and made their way around the police to purchase a cup of lemonade.  To see a child shrug at a cops threat, then defiantly disobey it… it was inspirational, and gave me hope for the inevitable positive change that will come from all this.

 

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83 Comments

  1. You can't serve lemonade to thirsty folks on a hot day!

    What kind of country do you think this is!?

  2. The state shouldn't be forcing lemonade sellers to obtain a license, nor should the state be jailing people for any reason (I'm a prison abolitionist, see). Totally bogus on their part.

    Though the whole "lemonade liberation day" reads like a sad parody. Anarchists did the same thing weeks ago with their solidarity events for Food Not Bombs after FNB was arrested for feeding the homeless for free in public. To them, it's not about "selling" (they don't believe in market economies, see) but about helping others who need the help.

  3. I don't know. I guess the reason it irks me is because it just seems like another case of right-libertarian types trying to combine traditional anarchist notions of freedom from authority and hierarchy with commodity fetishism. It's a lot like the people in NH who boast about the "freedom" to buy raw milk or whatever; it's just a commodity, not a triumph of liberty.

  4. Great job Meg, thanks for your sacrifice. Now I'm thirst… haha

  5. Good job lemonade liberty ladies and lads.

  6. @Julia

    lemonade l day is about about making the "authorities" do absurd things so that they can be put on wide display. So that the the MASSES will demand : "LESS GOVERNMENT!!"

    So that the masses will say "the cops breaking up a child's lemonade stand! Government is OUT OF HAND! .We need less government"

    Maybe this isn't a "triumph of liberty julia"

    What do you have Julia? What to YOU would be a "triumph of liberty".

    This was a organized effort to put government absurdity and intrusiveness on display.

    Te cops broke up the thing in dc, seems like they are on YOUR side julia because it seems like ,like them, you don't like it either.

    I would would say SHOW US HOW IT'S REALLY DONE .

    That would speak much louder then being a nay sayer here.

    Again it seems like your on the government's side Julia

  7. "I'm A Friend of Lemonade" tshirts.

    Y'all get on it.

  8. LEMONADE ("Lemon Tree"—written by Will Holt)

    COPYRIGHT AG 2011 by Sam A. Robrin or whoever the hell it is who writes these things. Go ahead and use it (hey, I lifted the melody), but if you make a little money on it, I want some!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RGtx1gYOxYI&fe

    When I was ten, my father said, "Let's open up your eyes

    To benefits you'll learn engaging in free enterprise.

    The day is hot, the crowds are out, there's money to be made—

    Go make this dollar multiply by selling lemonade."

    Lemonade: very tasty, cold and sweet and citrus-y.

    There's no quarter asked or given—just the price of being free.

    [But defiance, more than finance, is the price of being free.]

    Lemonade: very tasty, cold and sweet and citrus-y.

    There's no quarter asked or given—just the price of being free.

    I measured, squeezed, and sweetened, sawed and painted, advertised.

    Dad proudly Qik'ed my first few sales, but then we were surprised

    By boots that kicked the stand apart, worn by a local cop

    Who said without a permit and a course, I'd have to stop.

    Lemonade: very tasty, cold and sweet and citrus-y.

    There's no quarter asked or given—just the price of being free.

    Lemonade: very tasty, cold and sweet and citrus-y.

    There's no quarter asked or given—just the price of being free.

    Just out of camera range, I hollered, "Stop molesting me!"

    It's viral—now he drives a golf cart marked "SECURITY."

    We settled, I invested. Every year that cop gets both

    A copy of the Bill of Rights, and his policemen's oath.

    Lemonade: very tasty, cold and sweet and citrus-y.

    There's no quarter asked or given—just the price of being free.

    Lemonade: very tasty, cold and sweet and citrus-y.

    There's no quarter asked or given—just the price of being free.

  9. MY PINK LEMONADE ("My Green Tambourine"—The Lemon [!] Pipers)

    COPYRIGHT AG 2011 by Sam A. Robrin or whoever the hell it is who writes these things. Go ahead and use it (hey, I lifted the melody), but if you make a little money on it, I want some!
    http://www.oldielyrics.com/lyrics/the_lemon_piper

    Summer is the time for lemonade!

    Sweet and tart and cold and freshly made…

    Sip some sitting in the sylvan shade.

    Come join us in a cup-up-up-up-up-up-up

    Of pink lemonade.

    Revel in the atmosphere of peace…

    Broken by the onslaught of police.

    Bullies are all bluff—I'm not afraid!

    I offer them a cup-up-up-up-up-up-up

    Of pink lemonade.

    Protected by our firm collective No,

    Lemonade—and love!—again can flow.

    Now: BitCoin, silver, FRNs or trade?

    Come "buy" and have a cup-up-up-up-up-up-up

    Of pink lemonade.

  10. Were there any, *ANY* of you lemonated Libtards who actually thought you *WOULDN"T* be arrested…????….Just how fucking stupid *ARE* you people…????….Think of it like this: Ya'll went down to the front yard of my Uncle Sams' Big House, and ya set up tables, and ya *SOLD*FOR*GOV'T*FIAT*FUNNY*MONEY, lemonade…Then, some of the paid house servants came out and dragged your sorry asses off and gave you a drink of your own *KOOL*AID*…So, when ya'll see me in *YOUR* front yard, selling *SELLING* lemonade, ya'll be cool wit dat, *RIGHT*…???……Lemme know yur street address, and I be sellin' dere 2-morrow. ……Ize just been done gone over the fuxkin' line wit you moron libtards and FREAKWEENIES…I iz officially sick of your shit…You been warned…Next, *JUGGALO*JOY*JUICE*………I be sellin' JUGGALO*JOY*JUICE in *YOUR* FRONT*YARD, IAN……ENJOY your 3-hots-cots, asswipe….the gales of November come early…….~tKoK.

  11. Apparently, dickwad, the price of *MY*FREEDOM*, is having to put up with juvenile assholes like you people, who seem to think that *ANYTHING* you're free to think, is something you're free to do….Just because *YOU* think *YOU* can do whatever *YOU* want…Guess what…???….The National Capitol Police exercised THEIR*RIGHTS* to do whatever they want, and they want arrest you. Which they did. So, you shitbrains are bitching because *YOU* exercised *YOUR* rights, *THEY* exercised THEIRS, now you're even…Quel Problemo??? ………Give yurself a bitchslap, Smeg, you ROCK girl………Smeg is so smokin' hot, she makes Ann Coulter look like yesterdays dogfood….Smeg looks like she should be GIVING*IT away, not *SELLING*IT*….I'm talkin' bout lemonade, babe, squeeze my lemon, till the juice runs down my smeg-leg…..heh-heh-heh-HEY, I got a little *SMEG-LEG* fer ya' gurl…yassuh! Dat shit be *ICE*COLD*…Damn, give me brain-freeze…But I digress. I'm curious. It was the un-regulated, overly-chilled lemonade what gave me brain-freeze…What made you people's brains freeze???….OOOOH!…a camera!…Say, "Squeeze!"…

  12. Now on loan from FOX NEWS, our latest blogger, "PaulO"…WTF???…..The *ONLY* media you could find this on was FOX*NEWS…???….cut the shit…We PROVED "FreeKeene" and twatface girlie-man Ian are KOCH*BROS *STOOGES* MONTHS ago……~tKoK.

  13. To the Tune of "Lemon Tree":

    Lemon Free, vary a D.C.,

    And the lemon power is Tweet,

    But the poetry of Red Robrin,

    Is impossible to read…

    NOW*THATS*A*POEM*…

    ~tKoK.

    Copyleft, 2011….

  14. "To them, it’s not about “selling” (they don’t believe in market economies, see)"

    Those who do not believe in market economies should boycott them, although I do get a good laugh out of those who complain about capitalism via products produced and distributed by the market economy.

    "It’s a lot like the people in NH who boast about the “freedom” to buy raw milk or whatever; it’s just a commodity, not a triumph of liberty."

    Unfortunately these days being able to purchase commodities of a high level of quality without state interference is a triumph of liberty.

  15. "(I’m a prison abolitionist, see). "

    Interesting. What do you propose we do about the Ted Bundy types?

  16. Hello "A critic" ,

    You may already know this..but food for thought…

    The Ted Bundy types create victims. People that peacefully own themselves or freely transact with others on a consensual basis don't create victims.

  17. "nfortunately these days being able to purchase commodities of a high level of quality without state interference is a triumph of liberty."

    Sorry, but I just don't see how "buying and selling = freedom". Maybe to someone who prescribes god-like qualities to commodities but not to any sane individual.

    In capitalist markets, our relations with each other degenerate to commodity exchange. The system creates a materialistic view of ourselves where we start to think of ourselves and others by what we own (especially in terms of money) and not about who we are, or what we own becomes who we are in our minds. I don't see how this equates to freedom at all.

    So I move to NH and buy up all the raw milk I can; okay, how am I any more "free" now that I own stuff that's banned elsewhere? It's just sad how we're conditioned to think like this in the first place.

  18. Kok, you know that no one takes your nonsensical rantings seriously. I try and read your comments but have concluded that they are worthless.

  19. I'm curious: did it ever occur to you to have cups printed with information on the rather inane practice of busting lemonade stands and give the lemonade away, rather than provoke the US Capitol Police into arresting you?

    I'm not saying it's not inane when local police departments bust up lemonade stands – it is. If they tried to do that where I lived (they don't, because not insane in my town), I would do something about it. It's somewhere between petty and draconian (but mostly, I think it's about revenue).

    But you could have reached more tourists on a Saturday afternoon in August by not being arrested in one of your "activism theater" events. Handing lemonade out in cups is permitted. The USCP wouldn't have been happy, but they would have let you stay there longer if you were giving away your lemonade. And Mall visitors come from all over the country and the globe.

    If you had taken the time to look down that long expanse of National Mall, there are no vendors (except for the popcorn carts). That's a National Park Service thing, not a local ordinance. This wasn't standing up for little kids getting their stands closed down on their own driveways, this was the equivalent of getting busted for setting up a lemonade stand in the prison yard of Alcatraz.

    (Actually, that was the whole problem with the Jefferson Memorial thing, too – if people wanted to Flash Mob on the lower steps or plaza, I don't think anyone would have said boo. Or if they did, the initial flash mob that set the whole thing off would have been done before they decided what to do with them. NPS doesn't like to give out permits for the Jefferson rotunda for safety reasons – both for people and the memorial itself. That's a long-standing policy. I know because I graduated from high school on the Jefferson Memorial plaza – something far more ornate than a simple flash mob. We got our permit, they showed us where we were allowed, and it happened. Isn't that how "a society based on consensual agreements between human beings" works?)

    Besides, the US Capitol Police take their job very seriously. Unless you had a demonstration permit (let alone a vendor permit), they were going to give you a hassle. But I bet you knew that. I guess you felt it was better to be arrested than creatively spread the word about how you can get local government's attention to make them stop busting up lemonade stands. Another protestor getting arrested on the Mall doesn't even make a blip on my radar – I've seen a million of them growing up in that part of the world.

    Civil disobedience is not the same as getting the proverbial 15 minutes of fame. It's actually following through for more than a few weeks. (For example – how's your protest against TSA going? Any progress on getting AIT removed or pat-downs stopped? You were so outraged last November.) I'm wondering if you understand that agitating is not the same as advocacy. Especially in Washington, DC, a town that is incredibly used to agitation and demonstration.

    Next time? The west side of 2nd St SE and E. Capitol. You have a nice chunk of sidewalk, and if you do your camera work right, you have a nice view of the Capitol rotunda, the Supreme Court and the Library of Congress. And then you're also dealing with the MPD, not the USCP or the US Park Police, which is more relevant to this particular issue.

    Oh and by the way? The kids weren't being inspirational. (Unless, of course, they were kids of your followers, in which case they were less inspirational because their parents told them to go up and get a drink.) I worked with tourists for years – they saw a lemonade stand and walking the Mall with little kids in August isn't a picnic. Cops just make it more interesting.

  20. I disagree Garcia. If anything at all, tKoK never picks a side – he has ripped me a new ass as much as he has someone from freekeene; he speaks his mind, which I thought was the whole point of liberty. In this case, I feel he is correct in all respects, with the exception that Meg McLain is hot. I lost all respect for her when she got caught fibbing about her little TSA experience.

  21. Chasmosaur – you are the voice of reason – that was well stated – and especially interesting given you know much about the area. Unfortunately, you will soon be inundated with replies filled with unreasonable, but mostly self justified retorts. I live in Keene – my kids have had lemonade stands for years and have even had a cop stop once to be nice and buy a cup.

  22. @julia ,

    you said :"Sorry, but I just don’t see how “buying and selling = freedom”. Maybe to someone who prescribes god-like qualities to commodities but not to any sane individual."

    Wouldn't you agree being restricted from buying and selling is less freedom….particularly with the threat of jail .

    Being put in jail for "buying and selling" is less freedom.

    And thats what would happen julia.

    I don't get why you are acting like you don't know that.

    You make no sense Julia.

    sorry

  23. If only you had that piece of paper Meg!

    That's what makes all the difference — to the costumed killer-clowns in the video and the dellusional applogists here.

    Had paper never been invented, I wonder if such pigs & brown-nosing whores would still be present in our world?

  24. "Wouldn’t you agree being restricted from buying and selling is less freedom….particularly with the threat of jail .

    Being put in jail for “buying and selling” is less freedom.

    And thats what would happen julia.

    I don’t get why you are acting like you don’t know that.

    You make no sense Julia.

    sorry"

    I never said I supported throwing people in jail for buying and selling. I was simply making a remark on how sad it is that the definition of "freedom" takes the form of commodity exchange, as to many other things humans value (i.e. relationships between individuals).

    Maybe you could actually grasp my original argument instead of putting words in my mouth. "Oh, she's critical of capitalism and commodity fetishism, that means she supports caging people for selling lemonade!"

  25. @matt – I don't know what it is about this particular protest that annoys me, but something particularly grates.

    If they want to bring attention to this problem, there are individuals who want to give food away to the homeless and needy that are shut down by the same types of procedural issues. (Things like this – http://lubbockonline.com/filed-online/2011-07-18/… or this http://www.theblaze.com/stories/houston-feed-the-… )

    While I understand the food-borne illness aspect, I find this more disturbing than the lemonade stand thing (which is, let's face it, about racking up a fine or it's an HOA member with a bug up their butt). It's people actually trying to do something positive in their community. They are being barred by complicated governance that doesn't take into account some people just want to give back and help those who are in need. So why doesn't Keene Activism go to Texas and raise awareness?

    Or is it that "Lemonade Liberation" is more catchy? Or it's not an IndepenDANCE Party? Protest against social injustice should apparently be fun and cheerful and theatrical. Or in this case, about things that have communities up in arms anyway.

    Anywhere you see news on the banning of lemonade stands, no one in the wider community is happy about it and many complaints are lodged. Many of the fees and charges appear to be subsequently dropped once the story hits the news. So what's the point of this protest exactly?

    Are they asking for communities to build in exceptions for child-run businesses? Are they advocating for new rules for charitable food donation and preparation? Are they raising funds for the situations where charges and fees haven't been dropped? There's no logic or focus here, just outrage against something they think is unfair. Get angry…but get focused about it.

    Sure, it's stupid and unfair. But how does setting up a lemonade stand at the eastern end of the National Mall help change the situation? All it does is tie up the Capitol Police for a day and let Meg McLain get her very pretty face on FOX News for an under 3-minute filler piece.

    Telling people to disobey laws because you think they're pointless or stupid is different than encouraging people complain to their local government about stupid laws and working to change them. For all the information and energy they put into meetups and videography, they could research appropriate contact info and set up a persuasive form letter for people to send. Perhaps that's too much like work.

  26. i didn't "put words in your mouth" I quoted the words that cam from your mouth.

    I didn't say this "“Oh, she’s critical of capitalism and commodity fetishism, that means she supports caging people for selling lemonade!”

    Who's putting words in who's mouth.

    You make no sense Julia

  27. david-keene: I never once implied that sending people to jail in this case was justified. Please point to one thing I said which implies that I did.

  28. No Julia but you did imply that the freedom to exchange and trade is irrelevant and does not pertain to freedom. However, I think David is correct in pointing out that it is a freedom to those that wish to trade with one another.

    I should be free to act according to my own free will so long as I'm not harming another individual. If my will directs me to trade with others consensually and men in blue uniforms prevent it, I have lost my freedom.

  29. Jasper, I never said I was against commodity exchange all together; I was pointing out the fact that human freedom takes the *form* of commodity exchange and "buying as much as you can"/"grabbing as much money as you can" under the current system, because people have been conditioned to think that way. It's a very shallow concept of "freedom" if you ask me, especially since it reduces relations of people to each other to stuff. After all, isn't that what freedom essentially is: the relations we have with one another?

    I could own a lot of stuff (especially the things that have "special status" for being contraband everywhere else) but how does that make me any more "free" in society? And how does buying stuff give you freedom in the first place?

  30. @julia,

    I don't know WHERE you get that I implied that you said that : none of my words say that (your last statement addressed to me) .I DIDN'T say that . Just look!.

    ANYWHO.

    Read what I wrote. (starrting from my quote of you)

    Maybe you'll see what I actually said.

    Peace

  31. It's real simple, Julia. Somebody that wants to trade with others is more free when they don't have other people chasing them around, beating and kidnapping them for doing so. That's it. Just because you don't wish to trade, doesn't make anyone else's wishes any less relevant.

    It shouldn't offend you if someone's trade seems less than equitable to you. Let each man be the arbiter of value in his own life.

    Your lack of comprehension is more of an indictment on you at this point, not anyone else.

  32. You are correct, "Michael Garcia"…Truly, my non-sensical rantings are indeed worthless.Thank-you for pointing out that fact, and allowing me the space to confess the truth here…You are a giant of a man among midgets..kudos, Paco…~tKoK.

  33. >>>AND<<<…TO: "david-keene", chill out, dude…You really don't even begin to understand what Julia is saying…parlez-vous "commodity fetishism"???…TO: "matt", you're one of my favorite blogposters here, you hardly ever write anything I can agree with…and, finally, TO: "Chasmosaur", may I pretend that was *ME* wrote that long post above???…This "action" was like tying keys to your kite strings in thunderstorms..More fluff from the FREEKEENE, the Cheshire-County based home of independent-psycho produced FOX*NEWS content generators…~tKoK….ps: "david-keene", you do have a sweetness in your innocently petulant comments…please keep writing…you make *ME* look sane……~tKoK.

  34. "It’s real simple, Julia. Somebody that wants to trade with others is more free when they don’t have other people chasing them around, beating and kidnapping them for doing so. That’s it. Just because you don’t wish to trade, doesn’t make anyone else’s wishes any less relevant."

    Jasper, you have to look at the situation in relation to society as a whole. I have nothing against commerce. What I'm against is this prescription of ideals (i.e. "freedom") to *stuff*, which is what furthers the notion that these ideals *come* from useless commodities.

    Once again, I'll bring up my favorite example: are you any more "free" now that you've purchased some raw milk than you were before? No, because freedom comes from your relations to and with other people, not from what you choose to consume or from what you're able to consume.

    Watch this video in full to get a better, more clear understanding: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4MbUx-il6c

  35. Commodity fetishism? Capitalist markets?

    Sounds like a nomenclature fetish to me.

    It's all just freedom. They've already defined your life away from you

    Don't play that pseudo-intellectual bullshit.

  36. Julia, you're attacking a straw-men (although perhaps unintentionally).

    Commodity exchange is just one aspect of freedom. No one suggested that exchange is synonymous with freedom. Rather exchange is an integral aspect of the range of choices that comprise authentic freedom. If you don't have the freedom to trade, then to that extent, you aren't free.

    You say you're not against commerce but it seems you really are when you imply that if you aren't engaging in charity or gift economy, that you're choice of exchange is invalid. It seems like you're saying that only forms of exchange you recognize are valid or ethical.

    Also, your posts are widely off topic and delusional in consideration of your conflation of a simple protest demonstrating the lack of freedom of exchange with fetishistic hyper-consumerism/materialism. That is just indicative of sloth thinking and the incapacity to properly disentangle different concepts.

  37. Screw you, "Ryan Maddox"…I think you analysis of our "Julia" is pure bullshit. Not saying that *I* agree with, or buy into all her ideas, – and she does indeed have a labeling / categorizing fetish, *BUT*, I find all her posts to be far more on-topic and insightful than your crudely inept rehash would imply…Even when "Julia" is off-the-mark, she still brings a different and valuable perspective here. And, she is one of the *LEAST* argumentative of us on here…*THAT* should count for something….(Hey, "Julia", next time yur in Keene, look me up, and we can go have a coffee and go get all philosophical on each other…Whaddya say???…~tKok.

  38. @tKok

    I don't know what to make of your post but I'll respond with the assumption it's an accurate expression of your thoughts (perhaps a foolish assumption).

    I happen to like a lot of the ideas Julia forwards. I just don't like the divisive, elitist anarchist attitude. It's obnoxious and contradictory. If one favors freedom, then why do they undermine differing forms of value expression and free choice? Not everyone shares the same preferences. It's hypocritical for an anarchist to suppose their preferences are superior to others.

    I agree that Julia provides a valuable and differing opinion, but it doesn't justify her nonsense arguments.

  39. I just don’t like the divisive, elitist anarchist attitude.

    … and that's been my issue with her from the start. It seems that she is here more to thumb her nose than to be productive.

    I also think she was incredibly rude to Dave Ridley, one of the nicest fellows and hardest working journalists I've ever met in my life. You know, when she was out protesting cuts in government funding……. a thing apparently only "real" anarchists do.

  40. Shutup Meg!

    Brad, who let you back on the blog? Oh, that's right……. Captain Cruiser Blocker put you here…..

  41. I'm glad you got arrested because you failed to understand permits on US Capital hill. Also you knew 100% you were going to get arrested!!! Knowing that, this whole article is base on your plan to make the police officer look bad, etc. I have skateboard in DC for well over 6 years and have been arrested many of times – even worst what you document in this article. Maybe you will remember next time when a DC officer warns you, and I mean warns you on what they're going to do…you will stop.

  42. @Chris

    "I’m glad you got arrested"

    Congratulations, you are a sadist!

    "because you failed to understand permits on US Capital hill."

    False, Meg didn't fail to understand permits. I believe she understands permits, and that is precisely why she and others, myself included, reject them.

    "Also you knew 100% you were going to get arrested!!! Knowing that, this whole article is base on your plan to make the police officer look bad, etc."

    Those are speculative, unsupported claims. Even so, that wouldn't validate the laws and regulations or the police behavior. You seem to be making an appeal to force.

    "I have skateboard in DC for well over 6 years and have been arrested many of times"

    How many times will you be victimized before determining that you have the right to act without violent interference for the benign activity of skateboarding?

    "– even worst what you document in this article. Maybe you will remember next time when a DC officer warns you, and I mean warns you on what they’re going to do…you will stop."

    This form of activism is intended to increase public awareness and sympathy, so it's not clear what point you are trying to make.

  43. This form of activism is intended to increase public awareness and sympathy.

    Fail.

  44. "Commodity exchange is just one aspect of freedom. No one suggested that exchange is synonymous with freedom. Rather exchange is an integral aspect of the range of choices that comprise authentic freedom. If you don’t have the freedom to trade, then to that extent, you aren’t free."

    No, but it gradually becomes the *dominant* definition of "freedom" under capitalist markets. "Why should I care about others as long as I get what I want from the market" becomes the common mindset of the population under this kind of economy. Is that really what we want to base our system off of?

    People's consciousnesses are shaped by their material conditions. Base the dominant concept of "freedom" on being able to hoard as much as you can and you're bound to get a shitty society.

    I'm pretty sick and tired of the mindless drivel I hear day in and day out from market authoritarians whose philosophies are based not on compassion but on their own desires to own more and more. It's such a joke.

  45. "David"

    Seems to not know what the activism IS every time;then he critiques what ISN'T every time.

    Um

    Can someone help him to get it straight please.

    Because if he has it STRAIGHT at least he will then be critiquing accurately.

    As of now he misses the mark every time. 🙂

  46. Julia,

    I think you'd find that people are more accepting of what you're saying here if we weren't speaking of a perishable, consumable food item. Purchasing sustenance doesn't really strike me as hyper-consumerism or a society gone awry.

    I might be able to understand a little better if we were talking about cheap plastic toys from China but we aren't. We're talking about food which is why your arguments don't ring true. Everybody needs it to survive, so it's hard to demonize the act of consuming food, regardless of how it was obtained. Unless, of course, it was stolen, which isn't the case here.

    You're clearly not talking about food because I'd imagine you're smart enough to realize how incredibly difficult it would be to hoard perishable, consumables that are carbon based. It doesn't make any sense and you're showing yourself as a rabid ideologue, with a chip on your shoulder for free people exchanging commodities.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Lemonade Freedom Day Follow-Up - [...] being released from the government’s cages, activist Meg McLain has provided a nice write-up for the activism that occurred…
  2. Free Lemonade Meets Resistance From Farmer’s Market President | FreeConcord.org - [...] only reported arrests on Lemonade Freedom Day were in DC, which speaks volumes of how civilly out of tune…

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